Women Must Fight President Trump: Gloria Steinem Delivers Powerful Post-Election Message

On Wednesday afternoon, a first year female student at New York City’s Barnard College was vividly recalling the excitement of casting her first-ever vote in a presidential election for Hillary Clinton—and then the crushing despair of Donald Trump’s victory.

Among the 200 guests at Wednesday’s talk were advocates from ten women’s and human rights groups including the NoVo Foundation, the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, and the Center for Justice at Columbia University.

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CFJ Director Geraldine Downey Awarded Elizabeth Hurlock Beckman Trust Grant

November 16, 2016

Columbia Psychology Professor Geraldine Downey was recently awarded the Elizabeth Hurlock Beckman Trust Award for inspiring her former students to make a significant contribution to society.

The Beckman award, a one-time $25,000 grant, was created in 2008 by Gail McKnight Beckman in honor of her mother, Dr. Elizabeth Hurlock Beckman. Recipients are chosen for having inspired their former students to “create an organization which has demonstrably conferred a benefit on the community at large,”

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Youth justice study finds prison counterproductive

New report documents urgent need to replace youth prisons with rehabilitation-focused alternatives

By Adam Schaffer, HKS Communications

new report, published by Harvard Kennedy School’s Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management (PCJ) and the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), documents ineffectiveness, endemic abuses, and high costs in youth prisons throughout the country. The report systematically reviews recent research in developmental psychology and widespread reports of abuse to conclude that the youth prison model should be replaced with a continuum of community-based programs and, for the few youth who require secure confinement, smaller homelike facilities that prioritize age-appropriate rehabilitation…

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Atlantic Fellows for Racial Equity: Leading the Way to a More Just Future

The Atlantic Philanthropies | October 25, 2016

Dismantling anti-black racism to advance fairer, healthier and more inclusive societies for all

The Atlantic Fellows for Racial Equity is one of an interconnected set of fellowship programs – the Atlantic Fellows – launched by The Atlantic Philanthropies as part of the foundation’s final grants to empower new generations of leaders to work together around the globe to advance fairer, healthier, more inclusive societies. It is a 10-year, $60 million program to support courageous and creative leaders dedicated to dismantling anti-black racism in the United States and South Africa, two nations with deep and enduring legacies of racial exclusion and discrimination…

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Secretary-General Welcomes Selection of Manfred Nowak to Lead New Global Study on Situation of Children in Detention

Despite progress in the realization of children’s rights, as set out in the Convention on the Rights of the Child, too many commitments remain unfulfilled.  This is particularly true for children deprived of liberty, who often remain invisible and forgotten.  Most countries lack data on the number of children deprived of liberty and on the reasons, length and places of detention.  Detention of children may be decided by judicial, administrative or other bodies, including the police, military authorities, immigration officials, child protection or welfare bodies, health professionals and non-State actors, including in situations of armed conflict…

 

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Beyond the Bars Fellow Sarah Zarba Writes about Second Chances at Columbia

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Formerly Incarcerated Post-baccalaureate Scholar Featured in The Milwaukee Courier

Letter to the editor by Christopher Medina-Kirchner

Recently, there has been a tremendous amount of media coverage attesting to a heroin “epidemic.” There is not, and never has been a heroin epidemic. The term epidemic has a specific meaning: a rapidly spreading outbreak of contagious disease, by extension– any rapid spread, growth, or development of a problem.

Heroin use can be measured in multiple ways, but perhaps the most common manner in which use of the drug is measured is by examining data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH)…

 

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Ivy League professor: ‘I would much rather my own children interact with drugs than with the police’

 October 5 at 7:00 AM

Carl L. Hart was surprised when a student in one of his classes at Columbia University wrote an essay for The Washington Post about the effect of having him speak frankly about his past and the importance of having non-white faculty members.

Hart took the opportunity to respond with his thoughts on race and higher education, in the midst of the national debate over police violence….

 

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Formerly incarcerated students seek support at GSSC town hall

BY AARON HOLMES | SPECTATOR SENIOR STAFF WRITER | OCTOBER 5, 2016, 1:14 AM

Citing prejudice and institutional barriers to education, two students asked General Studies Student Council to provide support for formerly incarcerated students at a GSSC town hall meeting on Tuesday night.

In an exchange that lasted for the majority of the town hall, Leyla Martinez, GS ’17, and Sarah Zarba, Social Work ’19, requested that the council back an initiative to remove questions about criminal history from the School of General Studies application and co-sponsor an upcoming panel on the experiences of formerly incarcerated students like themselves…

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Justice in Education Initiative featured in Columbia Spectator

A Liberal Arts Education in Prison

BY ANA ESPINOZA | SEPTEMBER 26, 2016, 11:13 PM

 

Isaac Scott, a student at the School of General Studies, grew up 10 blocks away from Columbia, on West 104th Street. As a child, he would walk by the Morningside campus with his mother regularly, “either going up Broadway or coming down Amsterdam.” Even so, he never actually passed through Columbia’s (imposing, but generally open) gates or walked down College Walk. He was well into adulthood when he visited campus for the first time, with nearly eight years as an inmate in the New York State prison system behind him…

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